homemade relief for the cold season

So everyone i know seems to be sick, my household included. ironically i stumbled upon some homemade remedies to soothe body aches, sore throats and other things that pain you.

Homemade Heating Pad

Homemade Heating Pad :: Martha Stewart

Take comfort in an old home remedy with a heating pad filled with dried cherry pits or buckwheat. Click above for Martha’s tutorial.

Other Filler Options

  • Uncooked rice
  • Wheat
  • Feed corn
  • Barley
  • Oatmeal
  • Beans
  • Flax seed
  • Cherry pits

To soothe a headache, be sure to mix one of the above with …

  • dried lavender
  • Marjoram
  • Betony
  • Rose petals
  • Cloves
  • Rosemary

Let mixed herb and filler sit in a sealed container for a few days (occasionally stirring). This will help set and distribute the fragrance a bit.

(Make sure to never microwave with the cover unless it’s content is full cotton. Also a good idea to make the cover removable to wash as needed.)

Cayenne Pepper Mouthwash for a sore throat

Herbal Throat Lozenges (slippery elm, marshmallow + licorice)

Garlic can also be helpful when battling illiness because it will fight off offending bacteria or viruses. Try adding it raw to your salad and other dishes.

Humidify your home in winter: Part of the reason the flu thrives in the winter is due to you furnace. Artificial heat lowers humidity, creating an environment that allows the influenza virus to thrive. Adding some moisture to the air in your home during the winter with a warm- or cool-mist humidifier may not only help prevent the spread of flu, it may also make you feel more comfortable if you do get it.

Honey has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine for coughs. It’s a simple enough recipe: Mix 1 tablespoon honey into 1 cup hot water, stir well, and enjoy. Honey acts as a natural expectorant, promoting the flow of mucus. Squeeze some lemon in if you want a little tartness

This ancient Mustard remedy for the flu, chest colds, and bronchitis dates back to the Ancient Romans, who early on understood the healing properties of mustard. Mustard is loaded with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, many of which can be inhaled through the vapors. Impress Grandma by making a mustard plaster with 1 tablespoon dry mustard and 2 to 4 tablespoons flour. Mix both with 1 egg white (optional) and warm water to form a paste. Next, find a clean handkerchief or square of muslin large enough to cover the upper chest. Smear the cloth the same way you’d smear mustard on a sandwich, then plop another cloth over it. Dab olive oil on the patient’s skin and apply the mustard plaster to the upper chest. Check the patient every few minutes since mustard plaster can burn. Remove after a few minutes. Afterward, wash off any traces of mustard from the skin.

A cup of hot tea is just another way to take your fluids, which are so essential when you have the flu. Just be sure to choose decaffeinated varieties. Caffeine is a mild diuretic, which is counterproductive when you have the flu, and you certainly don’t want to be awakened with the need to use the bathroom when you need your rest!

Hot lemonade has been used as a flu remedy since Roman times and is still highly regarded in the folk traditions of New England. Lemons, being highly acidic, help make mucous membranes distasteful to bacteria and viruses. Lemon oil, which gives the juice its fragrance, is like a wonder drug containing antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory constituents. The oil also acts as an expectorant. To make this flu-fighting fruit drink, place 1 chopped lemon — skin, pulp, and all — into 1 cup boiling water. While the lemon steeps for 5 minutes, inhale the steam. Strain, add honey (to taste), and enjoy. Drink hot lemonade three to four times a day throughout your illness.

Try thyme when the mucous membranes are stuffed, the head aches, and the body is hot with fever. Wonderfully fragrant, thyme delights the senses (if you can smell when you’re sick) and works as a powerful expectorant and antiseptic, thanks to its constituent oil, thymol. By cupping your hands around a mug of thyme tea and breathing in the steam, the thymol sets to work through your upper respiratory tract, loosening mucus and inhibiting bacteria from settling down to stay. Make thyme tea in a snap by adding 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves to 1 cup boiling water. Let steep for five minutes while inhaling the steam. Strain the tea, sweeten with honey (to taste), and slowly sip.

[health.howstuffworks.com/herbal-remedies]


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